How to Make a Flawless PowerPoint Presentation

The world economy is in a state of extreme tension and competition. The current times are such that all companies expect their employees to prove their efficiency by exhibiting impeccable interpersonal skills and confident public speaking. Doing good work is no longer the only criterion that makes someone successful in their job. Making presentations is also an integral part of excelling in today’s corporate environment. These presentations go a long way in determining the understanding of the individual regarding the topic at hand.

Many people are fearful of making presentations as they wonder if they will be able to pull them off. Also, they are not sure of being able to cover the entire content and prepare a presentation that meets industry standards. Presenting the content in front of many people is another aspect which sends shivers down the spine of persons who have not made a presentation before. The following tips are sure to assist an individual considerably when they are out to make a PowerPoint Presentation.

  1. Understand that the presentation is a means to complement your program; your program does not revolve around it.
  2. Always remember to take back up of your presentation on a disc to ensure that the content is not lost and can be retrieved in spite of a computer crash.
  3. While using handouts, it is always advisable to carry an original copy of the presentation. In cases where the handouts fall short, these copies prove to be saviors.
  4. Experts suggest that the person presenting on PowerPoint should always position himself in a lighted area. This ensures that the audience can see the face of the presenter even while the lights have been put off in order to make the screen clearly visible. Not being able to see the presenter adversely affects the efficiency of the presentation.
  5. Usually, the final slide of the presentation always contains the contact information of the presenter. It helps to put this slide up while the question-answer session with the audience is on. This tip helps immensely because this way, the details of the presenter is visible to the audience for the longest possible time. The audience is given enough time to take note of the name, email address and phone number of the presenter.

People who keep all the above points in mind while making a presentation can be sure of coming up with a presentation that meets the highest standards of quality and professionalism.

What is Chemotherapy Induced Neutropenia?

Neutrophils belong to the phagocyte system and represent the first cellular components of the inflammatory response and key components of innate immunity. Most healthy people have an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of approximately 1,500–7000/mm’ of blood. When levels of neutrophils drop below 1,500/mm’ of blood, the condition is called neutropenia.

As a consequence of systemic cancer treatment, neutropenia is the most common and potentially serious hematological complication in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Neutropenia of this etiology is commonly known as Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) is the primary dose-limiting toxicity in patients with cancer treated with chemotherapy. It can lead to febrile neutropenia (FN), and it is associated with increased morbidity and early mortality, increased medical costs, and disruptions in potentially curative treatments.

The risk of infection in CIN patients ranges between 10% and 50% for patients with solid tumors and more than 80% for hematological malignancies. Several risk factors for CIN include older age, female gender, poor performance status, albumin level

What are the symptoms of Chemotherapy-Induced neutropenia?

The symptoms of CIN that most patients observe are chills or sweating, Sore throat, sores in the mouth, or a toothache, abdominal pain, pain near the anus and others. The initial evaluation of a patient with CIN includes medical history, initial physical assessments, urinalysis, sputum, stool cultures, laboratory tests—including complete blood cell counts with differential leukocyte and platelet counts—are needed to determine ANC and neutropenia severity.

The timing of the drop in neutrophil levels is based on the type or dose of chemotherapy. Neutrophil counts generally start to drop about a week after each round of chemotherapy begins.

The management of CIN involves two main strategies: modification of the chemotherapy regimen and/or the use of growth factors. The optimal strategy for the management of CIN is prevention. In the management of CIN, myeloid growth factors (MGFs), including G-CSF and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used in clinical practice to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) and its complications.

Also read- Chemotherapy Induced Neutropenia Market

What are the four formulations?

Currently there are four recombinant G-CSF formulations: filgrastim (nonglycosylated), lenograstim (glycosylated), pegfilgrastim (filgrastim in pegylated version), and lipefilgrastim (filgrastim in glycosylate version). Current treatment for neutropenia associated with chemotherapy is limited to two approved biologics such as Neupogen (filgrastim) and Neulasta (pegfilgrastim) and their biosimilars. Biosimilar versions exist for filgrastim and pegfilgrastim. The pegylated version differs for the different plasma half-life, much longer than the non-pegylated version (3–4 h), and allows a single administration of the drug per chemotherapy cycle.

How to Negotiate Your Next Telecom Contract

Time to Negotiate a New Telecom Contract?

Great! After reading this article you’ll be ready to negotiate that next telecom contract like a seasoned pro. The first steps to successful telecom contract negotiation begins by simply understanding the key areas which most contracts are based.

Sound simple? It is, so let’s get started!

Telecom Contracts: Do We Really Need Them?

Businesses sign contracts for all types of telecom services. In fact, you may have contracts in place for local, long distance, wireless, voice and data, etc. Keep in mind that the information contained in this article can be applied to just about any telecom contract negotiations.

A telecom service contract is an easy way for a service provider to lock you into a predetermined rate structure and set of conditions for a specified period of time. Having contracts in place makes it easy for a carrier to count customers. Multi-year contracts also help solidify the customer base – in other words, they can count on predictable revenue.

Contracts can also be to your advantage as well. Having contracts in place eliminates the guess work when conducting routine audits of your telecom services. You’ll never be able to verify that your accounts are being billed correctly without using contract terms and rates as a comparison.

The 7 Key Elements Included in Almost All of the
Telecom Contracts You’ll Sign

Listed below are seven common characteristics and elements that will arise when negotiating your telecom contracts. Use them as a “checklist” before you begin. It’s best to know what you want before negotiations get under way.

Keep in mind that the best deals seem to materialize when there is the element of “win-win” involved. Concentrate your negotiations on just two or three critical items that will make the biggest difference and have the most value to you and your company.

1. Most carriers will combine different offerings to maximize overall volume and revenue. Today more than ever, carriers are fighting to be your one-stop shopping for a variety of telecom services. The fact that they CAN offer you every telecom service, doesn’t mean you should follow their advice. Handle one at a time, then see how the overall package can be put together for your benefit and maximum savings for your company.

2. All telecom contracts will require a minimum volume commitment. This commitment is usually in terms of pre-discounted revenue per month. Variations could include annual usage, net revenue amounts or total minutes of usage. Determine your level of commitment based on previous months or years. Be aware that there are often additional sub-commitments included for specific service elements. FACT: The more volume you offer the carrier, the better rates you’ll be able to negotiate.

3. All require a minimum term commitment.
Two or three year terms are most common, but contracts can be written for shorter or longer periods. Like volume commitments, the longer the term – the better the rates. Service providers are usually willing to renogotiate an existing contract , even if only half the contract remains. Before renegotiating an existing contract, be sure that there are no early termination penalties or fees in the existing one.

4. The net rates are usually expressed in terms of specific discounts off regular published rates.
However, some express specific rates in lieu of service guide pricing. Bottom line? Be sure you know which is which during negotiations! Always be sure that you know the EXACT terms of the agreement before you sign on the dotted line.

5. Some published rates may be specifically waived.
Such waivers are common for installation charges and certain elements of private line pricing. Make it a point to ask to have these kinds of charges waived during your negotiations. After all, you won’t get it unless you ASK!

6. Most telecom contracts include a provision that is included for promotional and other credits.
These are applied at scheduled times to off-set costs of converting from other carriers’ services. Be sure to make specific notes of these credits at the time of negotiation so that you can be sure they were actually credited in the future just as the contract reads.

7. All telecom contracts provide for penalties if violated.
Sounds basic but….ALWAYS be sure you understand the penalties and costs associated with violating the terms of the contracts you sign. Penalties and fees can be substantial so make sure all contract information is provided to new employees who will be overseeing telecom should the original negotiator leave the company or is transferred.

Business Downturn and Technology Clauses

While not always offered by the carrier, many businesses are now asking for business downturn and technology provisions.

For example: A business downturn provision would allow a customer to renegotiate the agreement if the company cannot meet its minimum commitment levels due to unforeseen changes in the business itself (i.e. bad economy, layoffs, etc.). Usually a carrier will renegotiate a lower commitment level in exchange for a longer term commitment.

The Technology Clause protects a customer if they decide to change services to more advanced technology, resulting in lowered usage levels on initial services. An example of this is a company moving from a private line network to a frame relay or virtual private network.

Successful telecom negotiation can mean a huge difference in your company’s “bottom line” telecom expenditures. Plan your strategy. Familiarize yourself with the basics, and always remember: Everything is Negotiable!